Take a Break – Fallow ground; fallow times.

Take a break. The case needs to be made that all of us are best served when there is times of disengagement, seasons of rest and stepping back. I, myself, will be taking a break from contributing to my blog for a month and the articles will resume in August. As I take my break for this season, let me offer you a reflection on the very practice of doing so.…

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Deficit Budgets – Never?

Deficit budgets are considered by many to be a sign of poor management of resources. However, there are some cases and reasons why an institution can be well managed directly and intentionally into deficit. Wonder why or maybe you disagree with these reasons?…

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Conflict:   Recognizing, Managing and Learning through Relational Stress

Conflict is going to happen. You can only avoid conflict by pleasing the most powerful people, but eventually the less powerful will push the conflict. The conflict will come sooner or later. Conflict well engaged however, is a special thing. We need to identify what type of conflict we are facing. And, when conflict is of the type that is based on legitimate foundations then it is in fact an opportunity for learning and growth. That change of attitude is maybe the most powerful thing we can do to help us engage well.…

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Doing What You Say You Will Do

Some things can be narrowed down to a "most crucial element." Perhaps, in working relationships there is nothing more critical than whether we will do what we said we would. Or not. And how that impacts the quality of the work we're able to do.…

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Beyond Tokenism

<p>It is often and rightly assumed that a board or a committee needs to have diversity of membership:  that for a board to be effective in its……

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The Problem and Challenge of a “Representative” Board

Diversity is important, and a good thing. However, we often assume this means boards should be made up of people representing the diversity of our institutional collective. But this often means each board member has a specific personal agenda they are then expected to champion. Our board then becomes a collection of individual voices that will at some point be competing voices. We certainly do not want a group of yes-people who do not differ in opinions. And we need to be cognizant of the potential pitfall when board members bring personal or extraneous agendas.…

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